A "don't do" list for founders - Docket

A “don’t do” list for founders

Founding your own startup comes with its own particular set of challenges. Luckily, there are a lot of resources out there focused on this niche that helps founders get an idea of what they should do as the leader of a startup. 

However, it’s also crucial that founders know what not to do when trying to grow their venture. After all, starting your own business is far from low-risk, and making a mistake can lead to devastating setbacks.

Keep reading to get insight into things founders should not do and to learn a little bit more about how best to support your business and manage your responsibilities.

Are You a Founder? Don’t Do This

When you start a business, it’s vital to remember not only to push hard to develop your company but to use your time to upgrade your own skills and knowledge. Also, keep in mind that an overwhelmed and overloaded mind is not an effective or productive mind! With those reminders out of the way, take a look at the following “Don’t Do” list: 

  • Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket. This is a simple piece of advice, but it can apply to any and every situation. Try not to rely on any single investor, candidate, client, and so on.
  • Don’t implement practices just because it seems like something other companies do. For example, don’t implement mediocre policies or SOPs—be ready to experiment and learn until you find something that works for you and your business.
  • Don’t let work make you inactive. Physical movement and exercise have proven positive effects on cognitive function, emotion regulation, problem-solving, and more. Try to be active (walking, dancing, weightlifting, etc.) for at least 30 minutes a day.
  • Don’t slack off on fulfilling your basic human needs. The “grinding” culture prevalent today can have a negative effect on the way you think about work. You can be incredibly dedicated to your business while still getting 8 hours of sleep, eating 3 meals a day, and taking a Friday evening to watch a movie with friends. If you don’t take care of your physical body and your mind, you aren’t at your prime at work.
  • Don’t let your startup take over your life and determine how you value yourself. Of course, in the early stages of a startup, you’ll likely be working more than the typical employee or office worker, but be sure you can “disconnect” yourself from the stresses of leading a business at certain points throughout the day. Keep room in your life for family, hobbies, and relaxation.
  • Don’t hire without careful consideration. The talent you recruit early on can have a major impact on the direction your company grows in. Take hiring just as seriously as any other aspect of doing business.
  • Don’t fall into the trap of trying to do everything yourself. Many founders try to hold onto control for too long. You should be in charge of making your vision come to life, which includes hiring people that you can trust to do their jobs.

These are some of the main “don’ts” you should be aware of as an entrepreneur. It’s likely that you will have many people and projects vying for your time and attention, which is why it’s vital that you keep your focus and stay as organized as possible. Luckily…

Docket Can Help With That!

As a busy business leader, using the right tools can make all the difference in your stress levels and sense of preparedness. Docket is a meeting intelligence tool that helps you tackle meetings and schedules like never before. With collaborative agendas, you’ll always know what a meeting is about before joining the virtual conference room, and so will everyone else. 

You can also be confident that everyone on your well-hired team knows exactly what their action items are after each meeting without you having to remind them. These are just some of the features Docket offers, and all of them are created to help you store vital information and stay up-to-date on any situation. 

About the Author

Heather Hansson

Heather is VP of Product and Chief of Staff at Docket. She enjoys leading cross-functional teams to work together on vision, strategy, and implementing solutions that help people work and live better. When she isn’t helping rid the world of wasteful meetings with Docket, Heather likes to run, take violin lessons with her son, and spend time with her family.

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